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The oxygen transport system in three species of the boreal fish family gadidae - Molecular phylogeny of hemoglobin


By Cyril - Posted on 17 April 2014

TitleThe oxygen transport system in three species of the boreal fish family gadidae - Molecular phylogeny of hemoglobin
Publication TypeMiscellaneous
Year of Publication2006
AuthorsVerde C, Balestrieri M, de Pascale D, Pagnozzi D, Lecointre G, Di Prisco G
AbstractThe Arctic and Antarctic marine faunas differ by age and isolation. Fishes of the two polar regions have undergone different regional histories that have driven the physiological diversities. Antarctic fish are highly stenothermal, in keeping with stable water temperatures, whereas Arctic fish, being exposed to seasonal temperature variations, exhibit higher physiological plasticity. This study reports the characterization of the oxygen transport system of three Arctic species of the family Gadidae, namely the Arctic cod Arctogadus glacialis, the polar cod Boreogadus saida, and the Atlantic cod Gadus morhua. Unlike Antarctic notothenioids, the blood displays high multiplicity, i.e. it has three hemoglobins, similar to many other acanthomorph teleosts. In the most abundant hemoglobin, oxygen binding is modulated by heterotropic effectors, with marked Bohr and Root effects. Remarkably, in two species (A. glacialis and B. saida), the Hill coefficient is very close to one in the whole pH range, indicating the apparent absence of cooperativity. The amino acid sequences have been used to gain insight into the evolution history of globins of polar fish. The results indicate that Arctic and Antarctic globins have different phylogenies and lead us to suggest that the selective pressure of environment stability allows the phylogenetic signal to be maintained in the Antarctic sequences, whereas environmental variability would tend to disrupt this signal in the Gadidae sequences.
DOI10.1074/jbc.M513080200